Benevolence at the Ballpark

A man losing his wallet is akin to a woman having her purse stolen, even though a wallet is typically so much smaller.  The same level of angst and helplessness ensues when you realize this most personal of belongings is gone.  I should know, since I lost my wallet last Sunday at a baseball game in Denver.  But it was returned to me sooner than I expected, and that simple act of charity will leave an imprint far deeper than the carelessness of my actions.

59 - angst 1

Ironically, I made a deliberate effort to protect my wallet from the game-day crowds.  I put my cell phone in the same front pocket, making my wallet more difficult to “lift”.  It would take some real effort to bring one or the other item out into the open.

But that’s exactly what I did.  Unbeknownst to me, when I took out my phone after the game my wallet was pulled along with it, dropping unnoticed onto the gravel of the parking lot.  And off we sped for home, none the wiser.  Three or four blocks later that moment of angst kicked in when my hand grazed my now empty front pocket.  A frantic glance around the driver’s seat revealed the obvious: my wallet was really, truly gone.  Even though we were back to the parking lot minutes later (where we wondered whether this was a “loss” or a “lift”), our search through the gravel was fruitless.

Now I’d like you to meet Karen, my new friend. Karen lives here in Colorado Springs, maybe on the south side of town. She enjoys going to baseball games on Sunday afternoons. That’s all I know about her (and may ever know), but let’s add one more thing. Like the fellow from the Bible parable, Karen is a good Samaritan.

59 - angst 2

My wallet showed up in my mailbox last Thursday – intact and virtually untouched – wrapped in the note you see above.  What struck me immediately about Karen’s actions was the following: 1) she spent $2.50 or more for the envelope and postage; 2) she apologized for not getting my wallet back to me sooner; and 3) she chose to remain anonymous.  There was no return address on the envelope and the USPS tracking number protected Karen’s contact information.  In this day and age I am somewhat in awe of her decent, anonymous gesture.  My wallet may have fallen to the parking lot but it also fell into the right hands.

The same day my wallet showed up in my mailbox our local newspaper reported a nearby incident involving a stolen wallet from an unlocked car.  The thief is still at-large, and he/she attempted a purchase with one of the credit cards immediately after the steal.  I can’t help but think this is more than just a coincidence of events.

So thank you Karen – whoever and wherever you are.  I may not be able to repay your actions but I can certainly follow your lead.  After all, the world needs more good Samaritans like you.

About Dave

Clearly I have something to say. This blog was born of a desire to elevate our speech, using the more eloquent words of past generations. The stories I share are life itself, and each comes with a bonus: a sometimes-forgotten word I hope you’ll go on to use more often. Read "Eloquence" to understand more about the inspiration for this blog. Read "Phenomenon" for a taste of life in my neighborhood, or "Pageant of the Masters" for a few thoughts on golf's most hallowed venue. On the lighter side, read "Banana Rant" to see how much I dislike the yellow fruit. As Walt Whitman said, “That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse.” Here then, my verse. Welcome to "Life In A Word".
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3 Responses to Benevolence at the Ballpark

  1. Great story! Warms my heart to hear there is goodness in the world. Wallets are in the news lately. A man just got his wallet back after 71 years. Glad you got yours back sooner!

    Like

  2. Greg Wilson says:

    Glad it had such a happy ending! Of course I’m guessing that you had already started the process of replacing your credit cards, driver’s license, etc. But in this day and age it is indeed good to hear a positive story like this for a change. Thanks for sharing!

    Like

  3. Ric Wilson says:

    Fantastic story! There are good people out there still!

    Like

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